READING RHYTHMS/STRUMMING PATTERNS AND CHORD PROGRESSIONS AND TAB

In written music we would use the standard notation using things like crotchets and semiquavers etc. In this course we will be using a simple arrow system for showing you the rhythms and strumming patterns that you are to play. This is just just to make things simpler to get you playing the guitar. A down arrow will mean you are to strum downwards across the strings and an upwards arrow will mean you strum up across the strings.

 

The beat of a song is the term we use for the pulse of the music. The beat is what we usually nod our heads or tap our feet to.

At first the beats we will be counting will be 1 2 3 4 (which we will come to in the lessons). Each count to 4 is called a bar.

When we right down our chord progressions each bar will be separted with a line (called a bar line).

When we come to the end there will be a bouble bar line. If there are 2 dots on the double bar line this means you should repeat the section that is between the dotted bar lines.

The strumming patterns will be shown with arrows to tell you if you should be doing a down or up strum. The chords will be above the bar.

 

Often there will just be the chord chart showing what chords are to be played in each bar with no rhythm arrows. This can mean that any rhythm can be used to play the chord progression, and sometimes the rhythm to be used throughout will be displayed above the chord progression.

Rhythms will ususally be shown seperate from the chord progression and it will be stated if the rhythm is to be used throught the entire chord progression.

Rhythms will ususally be shown seperate from the chord progression and it will be stated if the rhythm is to be used throught the entire chord progression.

TAB/TABLATURE

Tablature is a simple way of writing guitar music.

The lines are to show which string are to be played. The lowest line represents the string that is lowest in pitch (the thick E string) and the top most/highest line is the string that is highest in pitch, the high E string.

The numbers indicate which frets are to be played. If there are two numbers directly on top or underneath each other, this means that they are to be played at the same time for example with chords. And, if there is a zero (0) on any of the lines this means that this string is to be played open (with no fingers on any of the frets).

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